ArtRage: The Norton Putter Gallery

505 Hawley Avenue Syracuse, NY

Exhibitions

CARVING THROUGH BORDERS

June 10, 2017toJuly 7, 2017
CTB-Mazatl-detailImage by Mazatl. He is an activist and artist who lives in Mexico
where he partakes in several collectives seeking social/political/environmental justice.

Opening Reception ~ Saturday, June 10th from 7-9pm
Special guest Holly Greenberg

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SEEN AND HEARD: Embracing Our Past, Empowering Our Future

September 9, 2017 12:00 pmtoOctober 21, 2017 4:00 pm

Seen & Heard image collage-web

This fall marks the 100th anniversary of New York State signing women’s suffrage into law. As we mark the historic milestone of our ancestors’ activism we recognize that the struggle for gender equality is far from over; and today’s women know it. In January 2017 we saw the largest protest in US history: the Women’s March on Washington with sister marches all over the country.

Seen&Heard-Pillow-Anne Cofer-webPillow” by Anne Cofer

In collaboration with the Everson Museum’s exhibition of the same title, ArtRage will feature the work of CNY women artists who use their art to speak out about issues still facing women in 2017. Exhibiting Artists: Suzanne Gaffney Beason, Lisa Brasier, Christine Chin, Anne Cofer, Mary Giehl, Denise Harrington, Gail Hoffman, Joyce Day Homan, Vanessa Johnson, Laurie Oot Leonard, Judy Lieblein, Emily Luther, Lorena Molina, Candace Rhea, Sharon Bottle Souva, Cherie Spara and Mary Stanley.

Become an Exhibition Sponsor!
A donation of $100 will list you as an exhibition sponsor.

STILL THE ONE: Douglas Lloyd Makes Portraits of Women Making Change the Old-fashioned Way

November 4, 2017 12:00 pmtoJanuary 13, 2018 4:00 pm

STILL THE ONE-MazwithMaz

For this exhibition, ArtRage sought out local elder women activists; all are 80 years or older. Still the One addresses urgent questions: what exactly is “activism” and where do we find it? What and who have we lost sight of? What endures? What will get us safely home again? We are seeking the wisdom of these elders in a troubled and urgent moment, going back to the source or back to the well; seeking to recognize those who persisted and endured and made a difference.

Doug Lloyd headshot

A photographer for 25 years, Douglas Lloyd has focused on wet plate processing since 2014. Wet plate collodion photography was invented in 1851 and widely revived in recent years for the detail and loveliness of its images. Still the One finds a perfect fit between method and subject; one which values age and history.

Become an Exhibition Sponsor!
A donation of $100 will list you as an exhibition sponsor.

WE ALL FALL DOWN: The Art of Donalee Peden Wesley

February 3, 2018 12:00 pmtoMarch 24, 2018 4:00 pm
WAFD-Encroachment V-web“Encroachment V” by Donalee Peden Wesley

The mixed-media drawings in this exhibition focus on the human/animal relationship. They are a testament to the plight of animals when forced to interact with humans. Encroachment, factory farming, medical research, military experiments, fur industry, trophy hunters, puppy mills and extinction are a few of the topics addressed. Penden Wesley chooses not to show the horrific or to shock, but to address the issues and invite the viewer to reflect, discuss, question and in turn help to resolve problems.

Donalee

Donalee Peden Wesley, received her BFA and MFA from Syracuse University on a full Jacob Javitts Fellowship. She has taught for over 15 years at numerous universities and colleges among them SUNY Oswego, University of Wisconsin Madison, Cazenovia College and Hamilton College. She currently teaches at Syracuse University and Onondaga Community College. Donalee’s work has been published in multiple books and magazines. She has received numerous awards and fellowships among them The National Endowment for The Arts and The New York Foundation for the Arts. Her work is included in many public collections including: The Everson Museum; Munson William Proctor; SUNY at Brockport, Liberal Arts Building and the Drawing Institute to name a few, as well as extensive private collections worldwide.

Become an Exhibition Sponsor!
A donation of $100 will list you as an exhibition sponsor.

WITHIN OUR GATES: Site and Memory in the American Landscape

April 19, 2018 12:00 pmtoMay 19, 2018 4:00 pm
WOG-raynard johnson-webRaynard Johnson: Pecan Tree; Parents’ Front Lawn; Kokomo, Mississippi © 2002 Keith Morris Washington

KOKOMO, Miss., Jun. 28 — A black teenager who was found hanging from a tree in his front yard in what investigators ruled a suicide may instead have been lynched for dating two white girls, the Rev. Jesse Jackson said Tuesday. Jackson asked Gov. Ronnie Musgrove and the U.S. Justice Department to launch an investigation into the death of 17-year-old Raynard Johnson.

Standing under the pecan tree where Raynard’s body was found by his father June 15, the civil rights leader said that the death “had the smell of Emmett Till all around it. Till was a black teenager killed in Mississippi in 1955 for supposedly whistling at a white woman. “The two young white girls and Johnson had been dating each other; that did not sit well with some people,” Jackson said.

The Marion County coroner’s office concluded that the honor student took his own life. (excerpt from newspaper article)

Kieth Morris Washington head shot

“The practice of human sacrifice, known as lynching, has been carried out openly, as a public social ritual, in the United States from the very founding of the Republic. Within Our Gates: Site and Memory in the American Landscape is designed to inform a broad audience about this phenomenon of lynching as human sacrifice within the context of the “landscape”. The term lynching faded from popular usage with the advent of the 1960’s civil rights movement. However, death by lynching is still exercised today as evidenced by the murders of James Byrd, Jr., Matthew Shepherd, Billy Jack Gaither, and Raynard Johnson. Only the taboo nature of this ritual has changed.” – (excerpted from Keith Morris Washington’s artist statement.)

Basic Black Contributor Talia Rivera sits down with acclaimed artist Keith Morris Washington to discuss his new series of paintings addressing lynching, entitled “Within Our Gates: Human Sacrifice in the American Landscape. Watch the interview.

Become an Exhibition Sponsor!
A donation of $100 will list you as an exhibition sponsor.

DISCORD & DISSENT: Commentary on Contemporary Politics by Jim Ridlon

June 2, 2018 12:00 pmtoJuly 13, 2018 4:00 pm
Jim Ridlon art-web“Budget Cutters” by Jim Ridlon

This collection of assemblages by Cazenovia, New York artist Jim Ridlon represents visual puns reflecting on the inadequacies and inconsistencies of our political systems. The work focuses on points of contention that establish party lines and inhibit the political process. Found objects are used as metaphors that comment on political strategies resulting in positions of power and dominance.

Jim Ridlon-studio image

Jim Ridlon is an artist and a former American football safety who played college football for Syracuse University and eight seasons in the National Football League for the San Francisco 49ers and the Dallas Cowboys. After his football career, he became a sports painter and sculptor, returning to Syracuse University to teach art classes and double as a backfield coach for the football team in 1965. He also wrote a novel and worked as a color commentator on the Syracuse University football radio broadcasts for over 20 years. In 1988, he was commissioned to design and sculpt the Outland Trophy, which has become one of college football’s most prestigious awards.